EventProf. Klaus Ensslin

Mesoscopic Thermodynamics

Semiconductor quantum devices have reached a precision and mautrity that the flow of electrons, i.e. the electrical current, can be measured in a time-resolved way, one electron after the other. This allows to measure ultra small currents, current correlations and quantum shot noise. The coupling between quantum devices can be strong and fundamental relations of classical thermodynamics can be probed, such as the second law of thermodynmaics on the level of individual electrons. Furthermore single electron charge detection in AlGaAs/GaAS heterostructures allows for a precise determination of the tunneling rates into and out of the quantum dot. This leads to a measurement of the level degeneracy of a state, which depends on its occulation and it can be changed by magnetic fields. In addition show that charge fluctuations in and out of equilibrium can be measured by implementing feedback loops into the detection setup. For double dots with a well-defined orientation of electron tunneling the strength of spin-orbit interaction can be investigated and tuned on the level of individual electrons. The talk will start by presenting basic properties of electron transport through quantum devices on a basic level

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About The Speaker

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Dr. Klaus Ensslin is Professor of Physics at ETH Zurich, Switzerland and Director of National Center for Competence in Research on “Quantum Science and Technology”. He completed his PhD at Max-Planck-Institut for solid state research, Stuttgart, Germany. After postdoctoral studies at the University of California in Santa Barbara he served as University Assistant at the Physics Department of the University of Munich, Germany where he received the prize for outstanding habilitation thesis. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society. Dr. Ensslin received Golden Tricycle award for family friendly group management at ETH Zurich. His research focuses on the preparation of ultra-small semiconductor structures with the aim to investigate experimentally new, unusual and unexpected physical systems with particular interest in structures that operate at the crossover between classical physics and quantum physics where several exciting and still unresolved puzzles await their discovery.